RICHARD A. KING WILDLIFE PHOTOGRAPHY 
The Hawks Of Barnegat Bay
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Barnegat Bay Sky Hunters

CLICK BELOW FOR SOME OF MY BEST SHOTS
TAKEN OVER 13 YRS. OF A SINGLE GROUP
OF NORTHERN HARRIERS 



The Northern Harriers (Circus cyaneus)
The true raptor of the Barnegat Bay  


#1 The Northern Harrier (Circus cyaneus) Juv. female
#2 The Osprey (Pandion haliaetus) male
 Though the Marsh Hawk and Osprey are the most common raptors of the Barnegat Bay and Estuary, spending a full season to nest, many other hawks are also accommodated here.   The photos below are some of those species. 

#3 The Red-Tailed Hawk (Buteo jamaicensis)
Though common on much of the inland estuary, they're only rarely seen on the east side of the Bay, probably due to a dislike of crossing large bodies of water.  This photo was taken in the late fall during migration. Like other  shots on this page it was an exciting bonus of the techniques I used for the marsh hawks. 
# 4 The Rough-Leg Hawk (Buteo lagopus)
Each winter few Rough Legs will take up residence on the lower marsh.  Though only casual visitors, they may stay as long as one month.  Have a size of 24"  and seem to leave in Feb. before the entire group of harriers return.   
# 5 The Rough-Leg Hawk (Buteo lagopus)
Frontal image of the above Rough-Leg

# 6 The Rough-Leg Hawk (Buteo lagopus) 
The dark eye shows this individual to be a juvenile.
# 8 Sharpshin Hawks ( Accipiter striatus ) Juv.
The Sharpshin is a most common  accipiter hawk in spring and fall, following the seasonal  migrations of warblers.  Only grows to 14' max.   
# 9 Sharpshin Hawks ( Accipiter striatus ) Juv.
All the white slashes on both these Sharpshins show them both to be juveniles.  Both were shot  in a small marsh pond in Oct. while attempting to prey on the plentiful Myrtle Warbler populations.
  
# 7 The Cooper's Hawk (Accipter cooperii) 
The Cooper's Hawk grows to 20" and is very similar to the Sharpshin
seen below.  Though I believe this classification to be accurate, by the shape of the head , I can't be sure.

# 10 Merlin Falcon (Falco columbarius)
At about the same size as the Sharpshin hawk, it can usually be told apart by the mask on its face.  
# 11 Merlin Falcon (Falco columbarius)
Both these individuals had the same MO as the sharpshins : preying on migrating warblers in the same marsh pond.  

 Photos, Note Cards and Greeting Cards

of the
Barnegat Bay
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